Tea Flavor Wheel – System for standardized tea taste description Been there, done that? You tell a friend or acquaintance of a new tea you have discovered or post a photo of the same on Facebook or in an online forum, and inevitably comes the question: ‘How does it taste then’?. Coming up with an adequate answer to this question can be a much harder task than one would think. …Read the Rest

November 2014’s ITMA Tea Mastery Course at Doi Mae Salong, North Thailand – The Recap

In a blog article published in October 2014, we had introduced the new Tea Mastery School at Doi Mae Salong, …Read the Rest

Top Ten “Great Teas of China” – the ‘Who is Who’ of Chinese teas (in need of an upgrade)

20 Great Teas of Chian with province/place of origin in China In 1959, the Chinese ministry of agriculture published a …Read the Rest

Anji Bai Cha and the “Da Guan Cha Lun” – When (Tea) Legends Become True

It was at the time of the Song dynasty, when in 1107 the then Chinese emperor Huizhong published his “Da …Read the Rest

The True Value of Tea – A Holistic or ‘Qi’ Approach, Part 1: The Process Dimension

What I want to do in this article is to outline a rather uncommon approach to the value of tea …Read the Rest

New Tea Mastery School set to open in Doi Mae Salong, North Thailand

Doi Mae Salong Tea Mastery School in clouds These are really great news for everybody thinking about taking tea courses …Read the Rest

Mystery Pu Erh Tea – a Key to Yunnan’s Oldest Tea Tradition

Mystery Pu Erh Tea – A Key to Yunnan’s Oldest Tea Tradition – Pu Erh Tea is a tea resulting …Read the Rest

The Globalization of Tea Cultivars – Trends and Perspectives

The Globalization of Tea Cultivars – Trend and Perspectives – Taiwanese Bai Hao (Oriental Beauty) tea cultivar in north Thailand …Read the Rest

Ruan Zhi Oolong No. 17 and what makes it the Queen of the Thai Oolong Teas

In our articles and online materials, we often refer to Ruan Zhi Oolong No. 17 as the “Queen of Thai …Read the Rest

Spring Tea and Airplanes – A Year’s First Tea Harvest

People starting digging into tea will soon come across the fact that the spring season doesn’t not only play a …Read the Rest

Long Jing “Dragonwell” Green Tea – Authentic & Wild

Jan 29, 2014 Many of China’s classic teas are tied to a legend or story and/or derive their name from …Read the Rest

Cha Khao Hom Rice Tea – A northern Thai Tea Speciality in Classic and Premium Version

”Cha Khao Hom“ is Thai language and in English simply means ”rice tea“. However, it is not a Thai version …Read the Rest

The Tea Gardens of Ban Hin Taek – Swords to Plowshares?

At first glance, nothing indicates that Ban Hin Taek, today officially named Ban Therd Thai, is anything more than a …Read the Rest

Tie Guan Yin – TKY Qingxiang vs. TKY Chunxiang

Sourcing Tea in China, Chapter 4 Tie Guan Yin – TKY Qingxiang vs. TKY Chunxiang What bewildered us when we …Read the Rest

Lapsang Souchong, Zheng Shan Xiao Zhong, Jin Jun Mei Tea – all the same?

Lapsang Souchong, Zheng Shan Xiao Zhong and Jin Jun Mei Tea – all the same? Recently, in the context of …Read the Rest

Sourcing Tea in China – Chapter 2: The “Qi” of Tea  – Wild Pai Mu Tan and Artisan Black Yunnan Golden Needles

Sourcing Tea in China – Chapter 2: The “Qi” of Tea – Wild Bai Mu Dan and Black Yunnan Golden …Read the Rest

Sourcing Tea in China – Chapter I : The Plan + Tie Guan Yin

Sourcing Tea in China – Chapter I : The Plan + Tie Guan Yin Part 1 The Project: Identifying a …Read the Rest

SIAM TEABLOID – The Blog Inside Siam Tea Blog – Everything Else About Tea

SIAM TEABLOID – The Blog Inside Siam Tea Blog – Everything Else About Tea A Darjeeling… where does it have …Read the Rest

Jin Xuan Hoarfrost Oolong Tea (Winter Harvest) – the exception from the rule

Digging deeper into the rules of tea cultivation, you will soon learn that the tea plant is usually harvested several times a year. This applies to most teas, with exceptions such us… some tea varieties, with the Jin Xuan Oolong No. 12 among these, will produce another harvest, a winter harvest collected in December/January, standing out with a special aroma and extraordinary taste… some tea varieties, with the Jin Xuan Oolong No. 12 among these, will produce another harvest, a winter harvest collected in December/January, standing out with a special aroma and extraordinary taste… some tea varieties, with the Jin Xuan Oolong No. 12 among these, will produce another harvest, a winter harvest collected in December/January, standing out with a special aroma and extraordinary taste… Still, only few tippies (tops of branches with the youngest leaves respectively) will suffice the requirements of a high quality Hoarfrost Oolong, thus making the winter harvest a more-than-usual effort and causing it to produce rather low volumes of tea leaf. READ MORE

Jin Xuan Oolong (Taiwan Tea Cultivar No. 12), the most versatile of Thai-Oolongs

In principal, you can process any tea plant species’ leaves to a near-indefinite variety of teas: you can process them as a green tea, a black tea, or an Oolong tea… Still, with time a processing standard has evolved for most or all known tea plant varieties… However, for some tea plant varieties there isn’t just one standard, but several alternative ways to produce different teas of equal desirability have emerged instead… Our Taiwan Jin Xuan Oolong tea cultivar No. 12 is a perfect example for this… I have come to know it alternatively as an Oolong tea, as a black tea, and as a “winter tea”… Taste and aroma of the Jin Xuan Oolong tea… we have the grassy elements, reminiscences of green tea… we have the earthy base notes that are so typical for Oolong teas… we do have some sweetness, too… another description I have often used to describe Jin Xuan Oolong tea: a most “honest” one among those “fine” Oolong teas… READ MORE

“Bai Yai” – The Old Tea Tree of North Thailand

The Camellia Sinensis Assamica tea species has been growing wild in the form of trees in most south east Asian countries for centuries… Though the production of green tea was the prevailing method in those times, the processing methods varied regarding drying and heating procedures, in particular the production of post-fermented tea produced in a way similar to Pu Errh tea can be tracked back for many decades… the new Chinese settlers, who had been playing a key role in the outlawed trade, started getting back to those old assamica tea trees and took up a more commercial production of green, and now also Oolong tea from the leaves of those old trees native to north Thailand. In and around the Chinese KMT settlements, such as Doi Mae Salong, they no longer collected the tea leaves only from the wild growing trees, but also started cultivating the plant in tea gardens… These teas, namely our ShanTea, our DMS Bai Yai leaves green tea, and our DMS Bai Yai leaves Oolong tea, are often referred to as “good everyday teas”… When people start describing the taste of these teas, they will often use attributes like “earthy”, or “grassy”, all centered around the element “earth… This, I think, the ability to create or reproduce a whole world just out of aroma and taste, is indeed one of the greatest virtues (say: qualities) a tea can possibly have to offer. READ MORE

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